A Ridiculous New York Hike: George Washington Bridge to Jersey City

The best way to view any city is by foot and the highlight of my recent trip to New York was joining an incredible meetup crew to do a ridiculously long walk! We all met around 10am at the Starbucks on 181st in Manhattan before setting off across the George Washington Bridge. 12 hours later we had made it to the famous Colgate Clock in Jersey City. The entire walk covered over 18 miles and we saw some incredible views of the New York skyline along the way.

The walk started very innocently at 10am on a crisp Autumn morning with a hot coffee from Starbucks as we waiting for everyone to arrive. The majority of the walking group were from Brooklyn however there were a couple of people from Jersey and Manhattan, and then me who was all the way from London. When we were all ready to set out, it was a very short walk to the iconic George Washington Bridge to stop for a few photos and enjoy the view before crossing.

At the beginning of the walk around 10am we meet around 181st in Manhattan.

At the beginning of the walk around 10am we meet around 181st in Manhattan.

Once you start to cross the bridge, you best walk in single file and without stopping. There is a lot of pedestrian traffic and even more bicycles commuting across this bridge at all times and it can become very congested if you don’t keep the pace up.

The iconic George Washington bridge connects New York and New Jersey.

The iconic George Washington bridge connects New York and New Jersey.

We walked single file across the bridge to allow cyclists to pass.

We walked single file across the bridge to allow cyclists to pass.

On the other side of the bridge is Fort Lee Historic park and we found ourselves officially in New Jersey territory. The park itself is a great spot for a picnic given the scenic views over the Hudson river.

Fort Lee Historic Park with the view of Manhattan behind me.

Fort Lee Historic Park with the view of Manhattan behind me.

We must of taken a wrong turn at some point, as this is how we exited the park.

We must of taken a wrong turn at some point, as this is how we exited the park!

The Hudson is 507km and aside from being a popular place to dump dead bodies, it also serves a political boundary between the states of New York and New Jersey. We walked to the suburb of Edgewater to the Japanese mega food store Mitsuwa where we stopped for lunch. I was impressed with the quality of Japanese food at the various takeaway outlets here (considering I was in America), which served everything from ramen, sushi and tempura to matcha ice-cream. There was also a huge Japanese supermarket selling many packaged delicacies and take away sashimi and sushi boxes.

Fresh sushi and sashimi at Mitsuwa marketplace.

Fresh sushi and sashimi at Mitsuwa supermarket.

After a hearty lunch we continued along the Hudson and passed the New Jersey suburbs of Cliffside Park, Fairview, Guttenberg and Weehawken and we saw many pretty sites along the way.

Decorative tiles along the Hudson river near Weehawken.

Decorative tiles inspired by the sea near Weehawken.

By the time we reached Hoboken it was already becoming dark. Just a week earlier, a horrific train crash had occurred at Hoboken station during the morning rush hour in which one person died and 114 were injured. A lot of the station was still barred up for the investigation although some trains were running. Around this time it had also started to rain lightly however we didn’t let that dampen our spirits or halt the walk. Instead we opened up our umbrellas, used our hoodies, or in my case I wore a waterproof hat, which is kind of like a poncho and fast becoming a very fashionable winter accessory in New York.

Hoboken station was the site of a horrific crash in September 2016.

Hoboken station was the site of a horrific crash in September 2016.

The bright lights of New York City over the Hudson River.

The bright lights of New York City over the Hudson River.

As we approached our destination we passed a couple of pleasant boardwalks where we could enjoy the bright lights of Manhattan from afar until finally coming to the large neon Colgate Clock near Exchange Place. We had lost and gained a few walkers to our group along the way. But for those who successfully completed the entire walk from start to finish in 12 hours, we were mighty proud of ourselves. This is a fantastic route for a clear day or evening, when you can truly appreciate the city skyline from afar.

Our final destination, the Colgate Clock near Exchange place.

Our final destination, the Colgate Clock near Exchange place.

Mission accomplished, together we completed a ridiculously long New York walk!

Mission accomplished, together we completed a ridiculously long New York walk!

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